Author Archives: Marisa Wexler MS

I AM ALS Expanding Efforts Into Research, Patient Support

I AM ALS, a nonprofit dedicated to helping people affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is expanding its efforts in scientific research and public policy. The organization’s new Science and Policy program will include three key focuses, according to a press release emailed to ALS News Today.

Childhood Form of ALS Identified, Linked to SPLTC1 Mutations

A previously unknown form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — one with onset during childhood — is caused by mutations that alter the production of certain lipids (fat molecules), scientists report. “We found that a genetic form of the disease can also threaten children. Our results show for the first…

Nearly $12M Grant Will Fund ALS Cell Therapy Trial at Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, in California, has been awarded an $11.99 million grant to support a clinical trial that will test specifically engineered neural progenitor cells as a potential therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The work, funded by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, or CIRM, will build…

MediciNova Secures European Patent for MN-166 Plus Riluzole

The European Patent Office will grant MediciNova a patent that covers the combination of MN-166 (ibudilast) and riluzole for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), MediciNova announced. The patent, once issued, will cover a wide range of doses and dosing regimens for both medications, and it…

3D Imaging System May Have Applications in ALS Research

A novel system for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of zebrafish may be useful for studying the motor and neuronal deficits linked with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a study suggests. The system was described in the journal Optica, in the study “Coded-aperture broadband light field imaging using…

Stretchable Electronics May Allow Wearable Sensors to Diagnose ALS

Stretchable electronics that are “intrinsically” stretchable — meaning they have tissue-like mechanical properties that integrate sensory devices with human skin — can better detect signals from a patient’s body than current, more rigid sensors, a study suggests. For now, its researchers are looking into a design for these electronics as a…