Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

Relyvrio withdrawn from US, Canada after Phase 3 trial results

Relyvrio (sodium phenylbutyrate and taurursodiol), an approved treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), was voluntarily removed from the U.S. and Canadian markets. Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, the therapy’s developer, made the decision after top-line results from the Phase 3 PHOENIX trial (NCT05021536) showed that patients who received Relyvrio…

Cigarette smoking tied to greater risk of ALS, especially for women

Cigarette smoking, either currently or in the past, significantly increases the likelihood of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), particularly for women, according to a pooled meta-analysis of 32 studies. A risk of the neurodegenerative condition was higher in current smokers, and it increased in a non-linear manner with more…

ALS Canada awards $200K to speed global disease research

The ALS Society of Canada (ALS Canada) has awarded two expedited grants totaling $200,000 to international researchers seeking to advance understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Provided through the 2023 ALS Canada Acceleration Grant Program, a $100,000 grant will support Mónica Povedano, MD, at the Hospital de Bellvitge-IDIBELL…

Familial ALS accounts for 8% of all cases, analysis suggests

The proportion of people diagnosed with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) among all cases is 8%, according to a pooled analysis of studies published worldwide. Still, data show there was a wide variation of estimates across the studies based partly on geographical differences, study design, the definition of familial…

Juvenile-onset ALS linked to new SPTLC2 mutation: Study

A previously unknown mutation in the SPTLC2 gene was identified in two patients who developed juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a study reports. The mutation significantly increased the production of certain types of fat-like molecules called sphingolipids, resulting in early-onset muscle weakness, progressive motor impairment, and involuntary tongue movements.

Top 10 ALS stories of 2023

Throughout 2023, ALS News Today brought you daily coverage of the latest clinical research and scientific breakthroughs related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here are the year’s top 10 most-read articles, each with a brief description. We’re excited to remain a dependable resource for the ALS community in…