Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

New B-cell therapy eases disease severity, delays onset: Study

Repeat infusions of naive immune B-cells were safe and delayed disease onset, reduced disease severity, and extended survival in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a study found. The approach was also deemed safe in the treatment’s first in-human case study, in which it eased disease severity and…

COYA 302 slows disease progression, lowers biomarkers: Trial

COYA 302, Coya Therapeutics’ experimental immune-modulating combination therapy, safely slows disease progression and reduces levels of disease biomarkers in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). That’s according to the now-published results from a small proof-of-concept Phase 1 clinical trial (NCT06307301) that tested the therapy in four ALS…

Target ALS raises $250 million to accelerate ALS research

Target ALS has reached its capital campaign goal of $250 million to accelerate research and fuel scientific breakthroughs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The campaign was spearheaded by founder Dan Doctoroff, a former deputy New York City mayor who was diagnosed with ALS in late 2021. He was…

Qalsody slows ALS disease progression in real-world settings

Treatment with Qalsody (tofersen) in the real world slowed disease progression in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by SOD1 mutations, a small study reports. It also stabilized patients’ quality of life and lowered levels of nerve damage-related biomarkers, which is consistent with clinical trial data that…

Relyvrio withdrawn from US, Canada after Phase 3 trial results

Relyvrio (sodium phenylbutyrate and taurursodiol), an approved treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), was voluntarily removed from the U.S. and Canadian markets. Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, the therapy’s developer, made the decision after top-line results from the Phase 3 PHOENIX trial (NCT05021536) showed that patients who received Relyvrio…