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    • #15309
      Amanda
      Keymaster

      ALS  — when your loved one is given this diagnoses, these three letters change your lives.  As a caregiver, where have you found the most support from?  There are community organizations that might be able to provide some assistance, are you comfortable accepting help? Do you have support from your family or do they live far away? What are your biggest challenges? 

       

      http://www.alsa.org/als-care/caregivers/caregiving-tips-and-hints.html

       

    • #15321
      Chuck Kroeger
      Participant
        <li style=”text-align: left;”>I’ve always been one to jump in and lend a hand – a God-given gift of serving.  Receiving and even asking for help is really tough.  We depend heavily upon our daughter, son and son-in-law.  But they have families who need them too.  Friends from church have pitched in and others have too.  Some tell us to let them know what we need, but its just hard to call and impose.
    • #15345
      Amanda
      Keymaster

      Chuck,

      Thank you for sharing. I think many of our members feel the same way as you. It’s tough to accept help, and sometimes it can be even tougher to ask for help. My father pointed out that often times asking someone for help is actually helping them. I think he was right. Many friends don’t know what to do when someone they care about has ALS. They don’t understand all of the emotions or how the disease will impact their friend.  They feel helpless and when they get the opportunity to “pitch in,” it makes them feel worthwhile.

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