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    • #11134
      Dagmar Munn
      Keymaster

      Changes in speech (also known as dysarthria) are common with ALS and progress over time. I am at that middle stage where I have trouble speaking but not enough yet to qualify for a speech generating device. Let’s share our tips of how we continue to communicate, protect what little voice we have and not stress out about it.

    • #12334
      Galina Pantsevich
      Participant

      I started having problems with speech two days ago, some letters at the end of words are difficult to pronounce. Please share your experience of how long you can maintain a conversational function, what exercises to do.

    • #12336
      John Russell
      Participant

      Not sure if I have a problem yet. I have been diagnosed 5 yrs. Occasionally , I feel that I am slurring and having a slight lisp. My listeners say the do not hear it that way. I’ve had the concern for months on & off. The majority of the time I don’t detect problems. Did not see a speech pathologist at my last clinic. I want to be sure she is present next time. Each loss I experience is so slow and insidious. If I think I may be losing something it may not be obvious for 1 yr.

    • #12339
      Dagmar Munn
      Keymaster

      About 4-5 years ago I began to notice my tongue felt thick, it was moving slow when I spoke and I was slurring words. My upper palate (back roof of mouth) seemed to be dropping, which gave me a nasal sound.

      Initially I thought that tongue exercises, speaking more, then changed to speaking less – – would all help. They didn’t. At the doctor’s I was sent to a speech-language department where they educated me on all the tech items (eye-gaze, phone apps, scribble board) that I could use instead of talking. But…I didn’t want to give up speaking – – no matter what I sounded like.

      Two things helped me: 1) Learning to speak with a lower pitch, move consonants “g, k” forward in my mouth and speaking slower but carefully, 2) use my diaphragm (like an opera singer) to produce sound.

      I am still speaking! Yes, slowly…and with a lower pitch and a nasal twang. But who cares? I am speaking. I take my time, breathe and avoid feeling rushed by others around me. That involves body awareness.

      So, here is how I learned better speech: https://alsandwellness.blogspot.com/2018/03/als-dysarthria-use-these-innovative.html

      and how to support it all through better breathing: https://alsnewstoday.com/2018/05/29/als-breathe-well-balloons-bubbles/

      Please feel free to ask me questions if you need more information in this area. 🙂

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